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Post details: Interest Rate Haiku

Interest Rate Haiku

The Internet bubbles with information, so when I need to make some sense of the highway robbery currently in progress in the financial district near you, I turn to its blogs for education and opinion. Naturally, I prefer authors with integrity, prescience and a penchant for critical thinking, those who don't change their cheerleading chant every month, like so many Monday Night Quarterbacks of the mainstream media (soon to become Dimebacks). Their incessant pimping and pumping would make you think that magic amulets became the latest rave of financial forecasting.

My favorite blog, Mish's Global Economic Trend Analysis, is written by Michael Shedlock, an investment adviser for SitkaPacific Capital Management. It is an erudite and well written guide through the labyrinth of contemporary economy, covering many of its intricate facets, without pushing any particular assets. Over time, a colorful and knowledgeable community gathered around the blog's comment section, where many investors, weathered and green alike, offer their views about the near term fate of the Dow Jones Industrial Waterfall. Since I can't predict the direction of the stock market any better than that of a drunk sailor coming off a spinning wheel, I comment only sporadically - just a few lines here and there - under the nickname "interest rate haiku".

Haiku is a traditional form of Japanese poetry, an idea condensed into three metrical phrases of 5,7, and 5 syllables respectively. Due to its extremely terse format, it is an antidote to the longwindedness of modern parlance, it is a mere reflection of a thought, a flitting spark of an image pushing its way through your mind, a snippet of an old familiar song that you catch in a car while you dial through the range of your radio. Haikus can be a tricky business, kind of like landing a private airplane on a town square, but to a true minimalist they offer a neat literary vehicle - seventeen syllables of heightened awareness, whose every single word must be self-conscious and arrogant at the same time. And best of all - they produce no intellectual waste - they are the greenest form of poetry.

Here is a dozen of haikus I wrote over the past three months, in reaction to various articles dealing with our economic plight.

=======================================

nov 15 (on assurances that financials are not crashing)

gin and ice for all!
hollered the twenty stewards
on board titanic

nov 16 (on futility of living off bubbles)

bubble gum bubbles
so fun to inflate...but boy
they stick to your face

dec 2 (on auto execs coming to dc for a bailout)

down under the hill
three stooges opened the hood:
where is the engine?

dec 8 (on market experts not seeing the obvious)

when the good times roll
everyone is a guru
emperor's tailor

dec 17 (on the incipient bubble in treasuries)

treasuries island:
long john silver ponders gold
is this my black spot?

dec 18 (on Japan's decade long efforts to revive their economy)

X trillion yen
and all you find in your pot
is tiny bonsai

jan 5 (on attempts to reinflate the credit bubble)

never ending smiles
much like credit expansions
lead to muscle cramps

jan 13 (on the pension funds implosion)

old men and the sea
your pension marlins go to:
the sharks of wall street

jan 22 (on execs of failing firms buying expensive furniture)

bed in jail - ten bucks
seeing the fat leeches squirm
behind bars - priceless

jan 26 (on dangers of lurking socialism)

Government spending
and perpetual motion.
Pass the weed, Lenin

jan 31 - (on attempts to prop up the housing prices)

ruthless pendulum
no country for old bubbles
now call it, friendo!

feb 16 - (on the pork laden stimulus package)

in lieu of big dreams
burger we can believe in
subprime stimulus

Comments:

Comment from: Paula [Visitor]
I loved the haiku. :)
Permalink 07/22/09 @ 13:06

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